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Not starting a new business – what’s your excuse?

April 21, 2016

Too often, people make excuses to avoid doing things they’ve always wanted to do, including starting a business. If you’re using any of these excuses, it’s time to change your mindset.

“I need more money”

You will always need more money. When you’re planning a holiday, you know that putting it off and saving a little bit more money would get you to that extra destination, or on that first class flight. However, there is a point that you have to stop and just go or you never will. The same applies to business start-ups. You need to create a business plan within your means and go for it.

“It’s scary”

Every entrepreneur has faced the same fear at some point. You have to let that fear drive you and push you to succeed.

“I’m too busy”

There will constantly be something else going on in your life. It is up to you to make time around your other commitments. If you really want this to work, you may have to get up half an hour earlier so you can research locations or spend your lunch break writing up a business plan.

“I don’t know the right people”

You might not know anyone that can help you yet, but give it time. With social media platforms like LinkedIn, getting in touch with professionals with experience is easier than ever. While not everyone will respond, you may find someone knows someone that can help. Put yourself out there and the connections will come.

“I’m not skilled enough”

Gaining new skills is incredibly easy when you have the desire to learn. There are books on almost any topic, articles on the internet or classes you can take. Talk to people and pick their brains.

“It’s been done before”

Just because you aren’t the first in the industry doesn’t mean you can’t be successful or even the best. Many successful companies are based on ideas that have already been done.

“No one is listening”

If no one is listening, try reconsidering the way you’re telling them. Maybe you need to appeal to their emotions more, or use humour. Be confident in your idea, and people will want to know about it.

“People are listening, but they don’t get it”

When nobody gets it, it probably means there’s something wrong with the idea. You need to figure out what that is. Modify the idea and take it back to the same people to see what they say. Use their feedback to help you.

“I don’t have any new ideas”

That’s okay. It can be incredibly difficult to come up with something new. Making something old better, on the other hand, is easy. Maybe you were using a particular product recently and thought about how you wish it was improved. Why not be the person to improve it?

“I’m a perfectionist”

There’s no sense in wasting time on the minute details that no one but you will notice. Be sure to step back when it’s time to step back, but there’s nothing wrong with wanting things to be perfect. It’s just important to find a balance and know when to stop.

“It sounds too risky”

Of course it’s risky. There’s no way to eliminate the risk entirely. You can, however, minimise it. Make a fall back plan. Have a reserve fund to help out when things get rocky.

“I don’t like to do things differently”

You will need to learn to step out of your comfort zone. Business partners and investors will require that you do things differently to how you want to do them. You have to be open to change, as someone else’s idea may be more efficient than yours.

“It’s hard”

It’s easy to be overwhelmed by everything that needs to be done and it can seem too hard. Break it down into smaller, achievable tasks with deadlines and it will become easier.

“What if I fail?”

Chances are, most people will respect you for it. In general, people know what it’s like to try and fail. Those that don’t are those that haven’t taken enough chances.
Stop making excuses to yourself and take the chance. Start small and jot down some ideas of exactly what you want to do. Before you know it, you could be shaking hands with investors.